Malsindo Agreement

The problem is particularly acute in Indonesia. In 2004, 325 hacker attacks were reported worldwide; Nine appeared in Malaysian waters, twenty in Thai waters, eight in Singaporean waters and 93 in Indonesian waters. [Citation required] According to the IMB, the majority of modern pirates in the region are of Indonesian origin. Among the countries in the region, the Indonesian Navy is the least equipped to fight piracy. Cases of modern piracy generally fall into one of three categories: those seeking easy profit, those collaborating with or belonging to organized crime syndicates, and those linked to politically motivated terrorist or secessionist groups. After making it clear that it was not sufficiently equipped to patrol the Strait,[15] the Indian Navy and Indian Coast Guard finally agreed to join the multinational piracy patrol in the Strait of Malacca in 2006. [16] [17] India is also building a UAV patrol base on the Andaman and Nicobles Islands to monitor the Andaman Sea next to the Strait of Malacca. [18] In summary, piracy is a complex problem that requires a non-traditional approach. States must avoid excessive military dependence and address the root of the problem, which many analysts believe is economic. This explains why whenever a natural disaster occurs by the sea, coastal and maritime communities are pirated.

Pirates are only victims of economic poverty and are criminals of opportunity, they are not ideological or social like terrorists, which is why they need proper policy and attention from the states concerned. For example, Lloyd`s of London has declared the strait a high-risk area of war for insurance purposes, unders highlighting the Reputation of the Strait of Malacca Outlaw in recent years. The stock added a 1% premium to the value of freight, which was reportedly “angry shipping companies.” [11] The declaration of the Seaway as a High Risk Area of War concerned the “wars, strikes, terrorism and associated dangers” of the waterway. . . .